Media Center

2019 Faire News Releases

 

2018 Archives

This longer slideshow of the 2018 Faire includes about three times as many images as one on the Homepage.

2018 News Releases


Feb. 1, 2018 : FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

For more information, phone Maker Chair Sandra Pettit Weber at (816)271-7571

 


Deadline coming up for Maker Faire signup

What do beehives, blacksmithing, glassmaking, robots and hamster wheels have in common?

They are among the area makers signed up to be part of the Big Muddy Mini Maker Faire in Northwest Missouri.

Makers are creative folks, entrepreneurs, tinkerers, inventors, hobbyists, crafters, educators and homespun engineers. And Maker Faire is a place where all these makers show what they have made and share what they have learned.

The deadline for makers to apply for the Faire is Feb. 12, and spaces are limited.

Among those makers already signed up is the Kansas Bee Company. It will bring an observation hive of bees to give the public an up-close and inside view of a bee colony. They also will provide education on things people can do to help conserve bees.

The 2-year-old Missouri School of Blacksmithing will introduce Faire visitors to the ancient art of forging metal and using tools to hammer, bend and cut. The school’s founder, Matthew Burnett, says, “I try to approach my classes and teaching from the perspective of what I would like to learn as a student.”

Tobiason Studios of St. Joseph will give visitors a chance to try cutting glass while they check out different types of glass, projects and tools used in glassmaking.

Maker Faire guests will also get hands-on with three different 4-H projects provided by the Oh My, The Robots are Here! team. One of their projects, “junk drawer robotics,” will give participants a chance to build a simple robot using common materials available around the house.

The hamster wheel maker is unique among the unusual and extraordinary. It’s the only 7-foot human-powered hamster wheel that allows participants to craft their own custom frozen beverage with no electricity.

Other makers include the U.S. Patent Office, Rolling Hills Library Createspace, 3D Print Everything, St. Joseph Writers Guild, 3D Printer Build, You Dream it You Can Make It, Plasma Cutting, Portable Computer Lab and the LT-1000 Trainer Simulator.

The Big Muddy Mini Maker Faire will debut March 3 at the Restoration Natatorium on North Second and Francis streets.

It is sponsored by the Heartland Foundation, Creal, Clark and Seifert Engineers/Architects, Commerce Bank, Walmart, Nodaway Valley Bank and Ellison-Auxier Architects.

The Faire is also inviting food vendors, presenters and entertainers to become part of this great show (and tell).

For more information, contact Sandra Pettit Weber at 816-271-7571 or go online to the Big Muddy Mini Maker Faire website at http://thebigmuddy.makerfaire.com.

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January 8, 2018 : FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

For more information, phone Maker Chair Sandra Pettit Weber at (816)271-7571

Local Maker Faire has nationwide connections, growing history

 

The Big Muddy Mini Maker Faire may be new to St. Joseph and Northwest Missouri, but it is part of a growing international movement, with 190 independently produced “Mini Maker Faires” and more than 30 larger-scale featured Maker Faires.

The Big Muddy Mini Maker Faire will host more than 30 makers at its launch the first Saturday in March. It will be held at the Restoration Natatorium at North Second and Francis streets in Downtown St. Joseph. The spot is only two blocks from its namesake, the Missouri River.

Many older adults grew up in the age of Tinkertoys, Lincoln Logs and Erector Sets, toys that helped to spur their creativity and imagination.

Young people today continue to find their creativity spurred by those and similar building products, such as Legos, but they can jump quickly and easily into much more sophisticated activities using computer-assisted technology.

“Smithsonian Magazine” says that Maker Faires are equal parts steampunk convention, craft show and Bill Nye extravaganza.

Some believe these Faires are the on-ramps that will enable science fair standouts, backyard tinkerers and basement fiddlers to find interested audiences who appreciate and support creativity and imagination.

The movement began in the San Francisco Bay Area in 2006 and quickly spread to Austin, Detroit and New York City. The flagship Faires in the Bay Area and New York City draw more than 200,000 people.

Kansas City offers one of the larger Maker Faires in the country each June. In its seventh year, the two-day event at Union Station drew more than 17,000 attendees, 1,800 makers and 350 maker booths in 2017.

Other Midwest Mini Maker Faires are in Springfield, Missouri; Wichita, Kansas; Omaha, Nebraska; and Des Moines, Iowa.

The Faires call themselves “the Greatest Show (and Tell) on Earth, a family-friendly festival of invention, creativity and resourcefulness, and a celebration of the Maker movement.”

It is an all-ages gathering of tech enthusiasts, crafters, educators, tinkerers, hobbyists, engineers, science clubs, authors, artists, students and commercial exhibitors. All of these “makers” come to show what they have made and to share what they have learned.

Tim Bajarin, a technology industry analyst, wrote in “Time” magazine that the Maker Movement is very important to America’s future because of its potential “to turn more and more people into makers instead of just consumers.” He adds that history shows when you give makers the right tools and inspiration, they have can change the world.

Maker Faire is a venue for makers to show examples of their work and interact with others about it. Many makers say they have no other place to share what they do.

For more information about the Big Muddy Mini Maker Faire, go online to http://thebigmuddy.makerfaire.com/.

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December 2017: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

For more information, phone Maker Chair Sandra Pettit Weber at (816)271-7571

Maker Faire coming to St. Joseph in March

 

If you’re a maker, the Big Muddy Mini Maker Faire is looking for you.

A maker? Yes, broadly defined, a maker is a creative person who makes things. Maker Faire is “part science fair, part county fair, and part something entirely new. It is an all-ages gathering of tech enthusiasts, crafters, educators, tinkerers, hobbyists, engineers, science clubs, authors, artists, students and commercial exhibitors.”

The Maker Faire is a place for all of these makers to show what they have made and to share what they have learned.

This Greatest Show (and Tell) on Earth is coming to St. Joseph on March 3. It will debut at the Restoration Natatorium on North Second and Francis streets.

Heartland Foundation in partnership with Aidex, City of St. Joseph, East Buchanan School District, Restoration, St. Joseph Arts Council, St. Joseph Chamber of Commerce, and Missouri Western State University are hosting the Mini Maker Faire. The faire will showcase dozens of family-friendly exhibits, hands-on displays and informative presentations. While the nearby Maker Faire in Kansas City runs three days at Union Station and hosts hundreds of makers and vendors, the local faire is a smaller, more family-friendly event.

Event Chair Sandra Pettit Weber said, “Our goal is to emphasize the STEAM agenda embraced by the Heartland Foundation. STEAM stresses the value of and need for education and training in science, technology, engineering, arts and math.”

Projects that the Faire hopes to feature involve an array of things, including drones, electric vehicles, electronics, hands-on demonstrations, how to fix things like appliances and clocks, interactive exhibits and art projects, inventions of all types, kit makers, puppets, kites, radios, computers, game systems, robotics, rockets, RC toys, science projects, shelters such as tents, domes and tiny homes, sustainability and green technology, unique arts and crafts and unusual tools or machines.

In addition, the Faire stage will welcome musical performances, entertainment and interesting talks.

The number of makers will be limited, so those interested should apply as soon as possible. The lineup will include a limited number of vendors. These may be makers who sell their wares as well as food and drink trucks and booths.

The daylong Faire will be open to the public for a nominal fee.

For more information and to sign up as a maker, go online to the Big Muddy Mini Maker Faire website at http://thebigmuddy.makerfaire.com.

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